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first_img“Some jobs seem to be more important to him than the jobs that are being lost here.” “He’s the prime minister for all Canadians.”Moe said there have been thousands of jobs lost in the energy sector while Trudeau’s government has championed a carbon tax and a bill that would change how environmental assessments are done. Moe wants both scrapped.Moe also criticized Trudeau for involving Canada’s ambassador to the United States, David MacNaughton, in the SNC-Lavalin issue when he should be working to get rid of U.S. tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminium.Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said Thursday that Alberta’s struggle to get its oil to market has a far greater impact on jobs than SNC-Lavalin.She also suggested jobs at the Quebec company would be more affected by Alberta’s economy than the outcome of any criminal prosecution SNC-Lavalin is facing.“We need our federal government to focus on the big picture and, by doing that, they will realize that Albertans need their attention.” Notley said earlier this week that Trudeau needs to get back to work defending jobs and farmers, especially since China has started blocking import shipments of Canadian canola.“We are calling on Ottawa to stop its navel-gazing about its internal controversies and fight back,” she said.Trudeau’s comments about protecting jobs at SNC-Lavalin has landed him in even more trouble with western premiers than he already was, said a political expert.“It justifies accusations of double standards that have started flying,” said Julian Castro-Rea, who teaches political science at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.center_img REGINA, S.K. – Two western premiers say the SNC-Lavalin affair is distracting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at a time when he should be focused on jobs in their region.Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe took aim Thursday at the prime minister’s comments about 9,000 jobs tied to the Quebec company.“I remind the prime minister again, he’s not the prime minister of Quebec,” Moe said.last_img read more

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Today is an especially sombre day in Lac-Mégantic as it has now been one week since the Montreal, Maine and Atlantic train carrying crude oil derailed causing a deadly series of explosions.The bells of a Lac-Mégantic church rang out 50 times to honour those who perished in the disaster, followed by a moment of silence. Some people could be seen holding photos of their lost loved ones. Messages of sympathy have poured in from across the country, and have been added to a growing memorial of notes, photos and flowers. Vigils were held last night as well in communities across Quebec including Montreal. Five more bodies were discovered in the ruins today bringing the official death toll to 33. The 17 people still missing have been presumed dead. Authorities have released the name of only one victim so far – 93-year-old Elianne Parenteau. They will release seven more names tonight on this day of grieving.An investigator with Quebec’s provincial police says the conditions of the recovery efforts are absolutely awful and they are expected to continue for weeks. read more

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← Previous Story Biegler gets New Year’s party against Berlin Next Story → VIDEO: Goal from 35 meters is nothing for one girl… chileMateo Garralda The new coach of the Chilean national team is well-known face in the European handball – Mateo Garralda. The 46 years old Spaniard will be one more of the many Spanish coach who are working abroad. Chile played at World’s Championship 2015 in Qatar as always third force in South America behing Argentina and Brazil (23rd place).The equal distance was kept in Pan American games, when Chile won bronze and place in Olympic qualifications.Sixth time EHF Champions League winner in his playing career, Garralda, has experience of coaching ASOBAL team BM Guadalajara between 2012 and 2014, and Romanian Stinta Bacau, the team who suffered financial crisis in 2014.The former head-coach is Argentinian Fernando Capurro. read more

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first_imgFollowing difficulties with right-of-way access and tight railroad-construction windows, Vancouver’s $44 million waterfront access project is running a year behind schedule, city staff told the Vancouver City Council on Monday.The delay — which included negotiations with the publisher of The Columbian for access on Grant Street — means the city council will have to approve changes to several agreements at its May 16 meeting.Inked in 2009, the development agreement with Columbia Waterfront LLC — a group comprising Gramor Development of Tualatin, Ore., and its local investors — says construction work linking downtown to the waterfront must be substantially complete by the end of 2011, with full completion by mid-2012. Now, project timelines show the work being finished by early 2013.However, Transportation Policy Director Thayer Rorabaugh said the city should still be able to honor its agreement to give developers construction access in time. “We promised access by a certain time, and we’re going to meet that,” he said.In turn, however, Gramor has asked the city to defer its $350,000 payment to chip in on the public project this year. Developers agreed to pay $8 million of the waterfront access project, and that agreement has not changed, city Budget and Planning Manager Natasha Ramras said. But because the city is a year behind, they also asked the city council to amend the development agreement to put off their 2011 payment for one year. The group has already paid $1.15 million of that balance, she said.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Army’s plan to shrink its active-duty end strength to 450,000 soldiers over the next three years will force the nation to assume a greater level of risk as the number of hotspots across the globe rises, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno said Thursday.“With the increased instability around the world, 490,000 is the right number, but we can’t do it,” Odierno said during a visit to Fort Carson. “We don’t have the budget to do it.”The decision to eliminate 40,000 troops was prompted by the discretionary spending caps imposed under the 2011 Budget Control Act. Odierno, who is retiring in August, is hoping lawmakers strike a multi-year deal to raise the spending caps. If not, the Army will need to shrink by an additional 30,000 troops to an end strength of 420,000 by the end of FY 2019.“I’m concerned we’re really on the razor’s edge at 450,000,” he said, reported the Colorado Springs Gazette. Additional troops are needed due to ongoing trouble in Iraq, tensions with Russia and other commitments on five continents.“As I make these visits to installations, I realize how busy our Army continues to be,” Odierno said. Soldiers stationed at Fort Carson currently are serving in Eastern Europe, Afghanistan and Jordan. “We have to be ready at all times.” Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

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first_img Tags The radiation warning message required by the city from phone retailers is: “To assure safety, the Federal Government requires that cell phones meet radio frequency (RF) exposure guidelines. If you carry or use your phone in a pants or shirt pocket or tucked into a bra when the phone is ON and connected to a wireless network, you may exceed the federal guidelines for exposure to RF radiation. Refer to the instructions in your phone or user manual for information about how to use your phone safely.” CTIA sued in June 2015, trying to stop Berkeley through an injunction. In April 2017, the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the ordinance, finding it was in the public interest and based on FCC information. But in June 2018, the Supreme Court returned the case to the lower court for further review. Samsung, LG, Motorola: How soon can we expect 5G phones? 4:36 5G phones and your health: What you need to know We ran 5G speed tests on Verizon, AT&T, EE and more: Here’s what we found Mobile Phones Now playing: Watch this: null After the Supreme Court decision, CTIA said it would continue its fight against “forcing retailers to convey the government’s message.” At the same time, Matthai K. Chakko, Berkeley’s communications director, said the city didn’t think the decision would affect the ordinance. In 2013, after a three-year battle, the CTIA prevented San Francisco from requiring phone radiation messages. Farimah Faiz Brown, Berkeley’s city attorney, said the city is pleased with the court’s ruling. “The city has always firmly believed that the ordinance is constitutional and serves the public interest,” she said in an emailed statement Tuesday afternoon. The CTIA said in a statement that it is disappointed that Berkeley is continuing “to mislead the public” about mobile networks being harmful. “Radiofrequency energy from wireless devices and networks, including 5G, has not been shown to cause health problems, according to the consensus of the international scientific community,” the CTIA said in an emailed statement Wednesday morning. The group has a 90-day window to consider its legal options. First published July 2 at 3:05 p.m. PT.   Update at 3:54 p.m. PT: Adds comment from Berkeley city attorney Update July 3 at 12:58 p.m. PT: Adds comment from the CTIA center_img 5G and your health Legal 5G Berkeley’s right to warn consumers about cell phone radiation has been upheld in court. Angela Lang/CNET Wireless association CTIA has failed again to get the city of Berkeley, California, to stop warning people that using a cellphone could expose them to radiation. As part of the long-running debate over health concerns in using mobile phones, Berkeley’s “Right to Know” ordinance, which came into effect in 2016, was upheld by a court Tuesday. Berkeley had been enforcing a city ordinance that required phone retailers to inform prospective buyers that carrying phones in certain ways, like in pants pockets or bras, could cause them to exceed the FCC’s guidelines for radio frequency radiation maximum exposure. CTIA had argued that this violated the First Amendment, blocking retailers’ freedom of speech by requiring them to post “inflammatory” messages. Share your voice 0 5G cell phones 13 Photoslast_img read more

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first_imgPakistani soldiers patrol in the port city of Karachi on 24 July 2018. Pakistan`s military fanned out across the country ahead of the 25 July election, deploying hundreds of thousands of troops to oversee polling stations in a short but acrimonious contest that analysts say is still `up for grabs`. Photo: AFPPakistan’s military fanned out across the country ahead of Wednesday’s election, deploying hundreds of thousands of troops to oversee polling stations in a short but acrimonious contest that analysts say is still “up for grabs”.Armed soldiers watched closely as election officials in the capital Islamabad Tuesday distributed ballot boxes and voting materials for polling stations across the city.”With the grace of God, we want to see a peaceful election tomorrow,” Election Commission secretary Babar Yaqoob told media, but warned that there were security challenges and threats.The military has stationed over 370,000 personnel nationwide to ensure the vote goes smoothly — the largest such deployment in Pakistan’s history on an election day. It has said the soldiers will work with local law enforcement to ensure “a safe and secure environment” for voting.An additional 450,000 police have also been assigned to provide security, according to election officials.The mammoth deployment coupled with a recent decision by election authorities to grant military officers broad powers inside polling centres has stirred fears of possible manipulation.The military presence is just the latest controversy in a bitter campaign season that has seen accusations of “pre-poll rigging”, the expansion of hardline religious parties, and a string of bloody militant attacks that have killed more than 180 people, including three candidates.Despite the controversies and bloodshed, political parties continued to criss-cross the country in the final days before the polls, holding dozens of rallies in key battleground areas.The contest has largely been distilled to a two-party fight between jailed former prime minister Nawaz Sharif’s incumbent Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz party, and cricket legend Imran Khan’s Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf.”Our predictions are very murky right now,” Bilal Gilani, executive director of Gallup Pakistan, told AFP, adding that a huge chunk of voters remain undecided.”It’s still up for grabs.”- ‘We will fight’ -At a distribution centre in Lahore, election workers complained of general discord and delays in the delivery of ballot boxes.”I have been performing election duty for the past 22 years and I have never seen such a disorganised election my whole life,” said one worker who asked to remain anonymous, adding that the troops overseeing the process had done little to help.A day before the polls, voters were largely split in Lahore, the capital of Punjab — Pakistan’s most populous province and long a PML-N stronghold that is now being fiercely challenged by Khan’s PTI.”I am supporting Imran Khan because he is the best choice for Pakistan. We should give him a chance,” said Muhammad Wasim, 32, pointing to what he described as the success Khan’s party has had in governing northwestern Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province.Others cited the improvements in infrastructure under the PML-N in the sprawling eastern city, vowing to stick by the party hit by several corruption convictions ahead of the election.”They have served the masses, they have put an end to… (power cuts) and given us better facilities including roads, transport and education,” said shopkeeper Muhammad Nawaz, 45.Political parties held their final rallies Monday night — before campaigning was suspended — in a last-ditch attempt to energise voters.”I am giving this task to all of you: wake up early on the 25th and cast your vote,” Khan told thousands of PTI faithful in Lahore.In southern Punjab, PML-N leader Shahbaz Sharif — the former premier’s brother — said victory was “certain”.”Despite all the odds, PML-N is winning the July 25 polls,” he was quoted as saying by Pakistani media.The PML-N has accused the powerful military, the country’s most powerful institution, of manipulating candidates and the media ahead of the vote in a bid to push out the party and install a pliant government, with Khan seen as the likely beneficiary.Activists and think tanks have also widely decried a “silent coup” by Pakistan’s generals.At a PML-N rally in the military garrison city of Rawalpindi, anger simmered over what participants said was engineering by “the establishment” — referring to the military.Some vowed to take to the streets if directed by their leaders.”After the election, we will fight,” said PML-N supporter Aftab Anjum, 67.”We are all ready.”last_img
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first_imgResidents outside a funeral parlour wait for news of their relatives missing during the explosion of a fuel pipeline ruptured by suspected oil thieves, in Tula, Mexico on 19 January 2019. Photo: ReutersAt least 73 people were killed after a pipeline ruptured by suspected fuel thieves exploded in central Mexico, authorities said on Saturday, as president Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador defended the army despite its failure to clear the site before the blast.Forensic experts filled body bags with charred human remains in the field where the explosion occurred on Friday evening by the town of Tlahuelilpan in the state of Hidalgo, in one of the deadliest incidents to hit Mexico’s troubled oil infrastructure in years.One witness described how an almost festive atmosphere among hundreds of local residents filling containers with spilled fuel turned to horror as the blast scattered the crowd in all directions, incinerating clothing and inflicting severe burns.A number of people at the scene told Reuters that local shortages in gasoline supply since Lopez Obrador launched a drive to stamp out fuel theft had encouraged the rush to the gushing pipeline.”Everyone came to see if they could get a bit of gasoline for their car, there isn’t any in the gas stations,” said farmer Isaias Garcia, 50. Garcia was at the site with two neighbours, but waited in the car some distance away.”Some people came out burning and screaming,” he added.To root out the theft, Lopez Obrador in late December ordered pipelines to be closed. But that led to shortages in central Mexico, including Hidalgo, where local media this week said more than half of the gas stations were at times shut.Hidalgo Governor Omar Fayad said 73 people were killed and 74 people injured in the explosion, which happened as residents scrambled to get buckets and drums to a gush at the pipeline that authorities said rose up to 23 feet (7 meters) high.Fayad said the condition of many of the injured was deteriorating, and that some had burns on much of their body. Some of the most badly injured minors could be moved for medical attention in Galveston, Texas, he added.Hidalgo Attorney General Raul Arroyo said 54 bodies were so badly burned that they could take a long time to identify.The crackdown on fuel theft has become a litmus test of Lopez Obrador’s drive to tackle corruption in Mexico – and to stop illegal taps draining billions of dollars from the heavily-indebted state oil firm Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex).Video on social media showed people filling buckets from the pipeline during daylight hours in the presence of the armed forces before the blast.But Lopez Obrador, who vowed to continue the crackdown on theft, defended the army in the face of questions about why soldiers failed to prevent the tragedy.”We’re not going to fight fire with fire,” the veteran leftist said. “We think that people are good, honest, and if we’ve reached these extremes … it’s because they were abandoned.”In the aftermath, soldiers and other military personnel guarded the cordoned-off area that was littered with half-burned shoes, clothes and containers.More than 100 people gathered at a local cultural centre on Saturday afternoon, hoping to get information about loved ones who disappeared. Officials posted information about DNA tests for identification and a list of people taken to hospital. ‘Like a party’ Lopez Obrador said the army had been right to avoid a confrontation due to the large number of people seeking to make off with a trove of free fuel – a few litres of which are worth more than the daily minimum wage in Mexico.Blaming previous governments for neglecting the population, he said the priority was to eradicate the social problems and lack of opportunities that had made people risk their lives. He rejected suggestions the incident was linked to his policy.Still, Lopez Obrador had vowed to tighten security in sensitive sections of the oil infrastructure, and the ruptured pipeline was only a few miles away from a major oil refinery.Pemex’s Chief Executive Octavio Romero told reporters that there had been 10 illegal fuel taps in the same municipality in the last three months alone. Neither he nor the president said exactly when the valves to the pipeline were closed.Relatives of victims stood huddled together, some of them crying, after the massive blast. Much of the rush to siphon off fuel and the chaos of the explosion was captured on mobile phones and began quickly circulating on social media.Mexican media published graphic pictures of victims from the blast site covered in burns and shorn of their clothes.Local journalist Veronica Jimenez, 46, arrived at the scene before the explosion where she said there were more than 300 people with containers to collect fuel.”I saw families: mother, father, children,” she told Reuters. “It was like a party…for a moment you could even hear how happy people were.”When the blast hit, people ran in different directions, pleading for help, some burned and without clothing, she said.”Some people’s skin came off…it was very ugly, horrible, people screamed and cried,” she said. “They shouted the names of their husbands, brothers, their family members.”Grief-stricken family members blocked access to the field for over half an hour, saying they would not let funeral service vehicles pass until they were told where the dead were being taken.Lopez Obrador has said his decision to close pipelines has greatly reduced fuel theft, but the death toll has raised questions about potentially unintended consequences.”There was a gasoline shortage, people one way or another wanted to be able to move around,” said local farmer Ernesto Sierra, 44. “Some even came with their bean pots.”last_img read more

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first_imgSubmitted to the AFRO by Dr. Kaye Wise WhiteheadI believe that it is now fair to say that despite our best intentions—our marches and our calls for peace, our prayers, sage burning, and our moments of silence—Baltimore City is rapidly becoming an experiment in urban living that is going horribly wrong. Ever since the fallout from the 2015 Uprising, this city has become more violent, more deadly, and more frightening. In the past month alone, we have seen a rise in homicide numbers and a sharp uptick in the number of shootings, including 11 people being shot in one day and two dozen people being shot in less than a week. Our cultural milieu is reminiscent of the wild wild west,  a place without laws, without the law, but with guns (lots and lots of guns).The mayor believes that the city is in the midst of a drug and turf war while I believe that this is what tends to happen in a Category Five deeply segregated poverty-stricken city without enough police officers, a police or a health commissioner, and a history of predatory policing. There are communities in the city where the sounds of gunshots and police sirens have become so familiar that they are embedded in the cultural fabric that stitches the community together. We are in a dark sunken place in need of some encouragement and some hope.Dr. Karsonya Wise Whitehead (Courtesy Photo)Now, I may not have all the answers on how to turn this city around, but I can offer a little light. Baltimore City is a city of survivors and despite how grim it may look at this moment, I believe that no city has worked harder to push for equality and peace more loudly or with a stronger voice. We must remember our foundation and our roots. We must remember that though they are trying to bury us under a narrative laced with stories of violence and destruction filtered through a lens of White supremacy, we are seeds and we will find a way to sprout and grow. We must remember how to fight and that we come from a long line of people who were willing to sacrifice and fight in order to save us and to save our communities.Frederick Douglass once talked about what it would finally take for people to resist and fight. He stated that there comes a moment when people reach the end of their tolerance with injustice and mistreatment and that when that happens they will resist with “either words or blows, or with both.” I sometimes wonder if we (as a city) have reached that moment? Are we frustrated enough, angry enough, pissed off enough to want to fight to save this city? Are we willing to get out on the corners and into the faces of those who are destroying our community and force them to flee? How much longer are we willing to allow death to happen at our doorstep while we pretend that we do not see the bodies? Douglass knew that we needed to be the ones to fight for our freedom, to record our history, to tell our stories, to remind the world of who we were, and to show them what we have become. We need to be the ones to tell our young brothers and sisters (the ones who seemed to have lost their way) that the strength of our people and the strength of this city is uniquely tied to our ability to mobilize the best and the brightest. We must remember that even though our city has a myriad of challenges, we are standing on Holy Ground, in a country that has been built on our backs, that has survived because of our sacrifice, and that continues to be a place of greatness because of our brilliance. We must remind them.It is time to reclaim our neighborhoods, reclaim our children, and reclaim the future that we have worked for hundred of years to have in this country. We have to teach them a lesson about themselves, the one that America often fails to remember about Black people, that we are resilient and failure for us has never been an option; that we are brilliant and we can effectively mobilize the collective strength of our genius and strategically plan for a better tomorrow; that we are knitted together so that our collective strengths support our collective weaknesses; and, that we are always on the defense and have never stopped being on the lookout for those subtle shifts when the winds of oppression and degradation, of second hand citizenship and destruction begin to blow once again in our direction. We must be the ones to save this city.Karsonya Wise Whitehead is the #blackmommyactivist and an associate professor of communication and African and African American studies at Loyola University Maryland. She is the host of “Today With Dr. Kaye” on WEAA 88.9 FM and the author of the forthcoming “Dispatches from Baltimore: The Birth of the Black Mommy Activist.” She lives in Baltimore City with her husband and their two sons.last_img read more

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first_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 The premiere episode of “Castle Rock,” the Stephen King-inspired original series from J.J. Abrams, will be available for free exclusively to U.S. users on the Apple TV App — with no Hulu subscription required.The “Castle Rock” series premiere will be available on the Apple TV App exclusively for two weeks, starting Wednesday (July 25). It’s the first time any network or streaming service is debuting an episode on the Apple TV App in front of any paywalls.Hulu is using a “sampling” strategy in the exclusive deal with Apple, in the hopes that the freebie first episode will spur people to sign up for Hulu to watch the rest of the 10-episode anthology series.In the series’ premiere episode, death row attorney Henry Deaver (André Holland) confronts his dark past when an anonymous call lures him back to his hometown of Castle Rock, Maine. In addition to Holland, “Castle Rock” stars Melanie Lynskey, Sissy Spacek, Bill Skarsgård, Jane Levy and Scott Glenn. Popular on Variety center_img The Apple TV App, available on iPhone, iPad and Apple TV set-top, lets users browse and access content from more than 60 TV networks and video services (including Hulu). It also provides access to iTunes purchases and a variety of free content.last_img read more

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first_img Ole Miss was highly visible on NFL draft night for all the wrong reasons. Offensive Tackle Laremy Tunsil’s viral gas mask bong surfaced from his hacked Twitter account minutes before the start of the draft.Tunsil’s Instagram account was also hacked on draft night. Screenshots of a text message conversation between Tunsil and an Ole Miss assistant coach discussing payments of improper benefits to Tunsil were posted on the account, and later removed.Tunsil admitted in a press conference that he received improper benefits from coaches. Although several of the current NCAA allegations include Tunsil, the university said it is still investigating Tunsil’s draft night revelations. Advertisement One day after Baylor Coach Art Briles was fired in a highly visible college football scandal, it was Ole Miss’ turn.  The allegations facing Ole Miss are decidedly less serious, but will likely land the program in hot water with the NCAA.Today, Ole Miss responded to an NCAA Notice of Allegations that players received improper benefits. They have self imposed a scholarship ban (11 scholarships) from 2015 – 2018. The NCAA has the power to levy additional punishments beyond those that the university has imposed.Yesterday in The Herd, Colin alluded to an unnamed SEC program that his sources told him had committed significant NCAA Violations.  Today he confirmed that program was Ole Miss.“I said on yesterday’s show. I knew of an SEC school that was cheating like crazy. And what do ya know. Late yesterday afternoon, Ole Miss came out, self imposed scholarship reduction in football. That’s the school I was talking about.”last_img read more

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first_imgTOKYO (AP) — Toyota Motor Corp. and Nissan Motor Co. are expanding their recalls over problem air bags made by Japanese supplier Takata Corp. by another 6.5 million vehicles.Toyota said Wednesday it was recalling nearly 5 million more vehicles globally for the air bag inflator problem. Some 637,000 of the vehicles are in the United States. In Japan, it is recalling nearly 1.4 million vehicles.The recall affects 35 models globally, including the Corolla subcompact, RAV4 sport utility vehicle and Tundra pickup, produced from March 2003 through November 2007. ___Follow Yuri Kageyama: http://www.twitter.com/yurikageyamaCopyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. In the latest recall, front passenger and front driver-side air bag inflators can deploy abnormally, or rupture, and put a person in a crash at greater risk.This is different from an earlier problem with Takata air bag inflators that deployed with too much force, which has affected a range of automakers including Honda Motor Co., Chrysler, BMW and Ford Motor Co. At least six people have died worldwide due to that defect.When combined with the earlier recalls, Toyota’s Takata-related recalls have ballooned to 8.1 million vehicles.Tokyo-based Honda, which has recalled the most vehicles because of Takata air bag problems, said it was studying the new problem and hasn’t made a decision yet about expanding its recalls.Nissan recalled an additional 1.56 million vehicles globally for the new Takata problem, with 326,000 of them in North America, 563,000 in Europe and 288,000 in Japan.Nissan’s Takata-related recalls have now grown to about 4 million around the world.The latest affects the Sentra compact, Caravan van and X-Trail sport utility vehicle, made from 2004 through 2007, Nissan said. The automaker said it will test the inflators and replace them as needed.Toyota said it will replace the problem inflators on the driver side with inflators made by Daicel Corp., another Japanese supplier. Top Stories Arizona families, Arizona farms: A legacy of tradition embracing animal care and comfort through modern technology Comments   Share   Sponsored Stories New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility 5 greatest Kentucky Derby finishes Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Toyota will continue to use Takata “since we have not at this point identified parts from a different supplier that are compatible,” the company said in a statement.Takata has not been able to keep up with demand for replacement inflators.NHTSA, the government authority in the U.S., which oversees recall, as well as Takata and the auto industry, have been trying to pinpoint what’s causing the inflator problems.“Toyota’s focus remains on the safety and security of our customers,” said Dino Triantafyllos, chief quality officer at Toyota Motor North America.Takata has been fined $14,000 per day by NHTSA since Feb. 20 for allegedly dumping documents on the agency without the legally required explanation of what’s in them. The fines have reached about $1 million.Takata has denied it is not cooperating fully with the investigation.Even before the latest recalls, 10 automakers recalled more than 17 million cars and trucks in the U.S. and 22 million worldwide because of the Takata air bag problem. There could be as many as 30 million vehicles with Takata air bags in the U.S. alone.The Takata air bag problems began surfacing about a decade ago. Takata uses a different kind of inflator propellant from rivals, ammonium nitrate, which can burn too fast if subjected to prolonged exposure to airborne moisture. New Year’s resolution: don’t spend another year in a kitchen you don’t likelast_img read more

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first_img “We are extremely pleased to have secured the services of Mr Long to help drive the many strategic and policy issues in which AFTA is engaging and his policy and industry experience will be of great value to AFTA going forward,” AFTA chief executive Jayson Westbury said. “I am really pleased to be joining AFTA and work alongside Jayson for the good of the travel and tourism industry and of course the AFTA members and I am looking forward to drive forward the many important issues that the industry is facing over the coming months and years” said Mr Long. Mr Long’s exceptional knowledge of the tourism and government sectors further enforces AFTA’s ability to represent AFTA members domestically and internationally. The Australian Federation of Travel Agents (AFTA) has announced the appointment of Dean Long to the new position of national manager, strategy and policy, with the role commencing 19 May. Mr Long brings with him nearly ten years of experience from the government and private tourism sectors and will be working alongside the AFTA chief executive on range of domestic and international policy issues to ensure continued growth in the travel and tourism industry. Prior to joining AFTA, Mr Long was senior policy advisor to the former NSW Minister for Tourism and Major Events the Hon. George Souris, where he was responsible for developing and advising Mr Souris on issues affecting the Tourism and Major Events portfolio. Source = ETB News: Lana Bogunovichlast_img read more

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first_img 0 Comments   Share   Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling The beginning of the beginning.I didn’t make that up, Wolf did. It’s not stealing if you acknowledge your own lack of creativity, but I love it for Daryl Washington.Every time I talk to Daryl Washington, I walk away thinking “that’s a good guy.”When you get suspended for using something on the substance abuse list, that means you’ve already tested positive once before and usually twice. Once is inexcusable, but to do it possibly two more times after the warning is the height of selfishness. ErrorOK… ErrorOK The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelocenter_img Top Stories Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires If my hunch is true, this means the light has come on for Daryl Washington, the human being. We all have seen how brilliant the linebacker can play. It is the beginning of the beginning because the past will soon be over. The last step is punishment from the league. Washington could be fined, suspended or both. I think he gets two games. Then, his past transgressions against his child’s mother, his teammates and his community will be over.I believe this will be the last time we’re talking about the faces of Daryl Washington we don’t want to see. I think he’s been awakened. If I’m wrong, I hope the Cardinals believe in three strikes you’re out. When you shove a woman to the ground, my immediate reaction is to rank you below things I step in at a public park.These are the three faces of Daryl Washington to me.I said immediate reaction because his sentence clearly brings up a different side. First, let’s dismiss the “slap on the wrist because he’s a Cardinals linebacker.” You’d be surprised how light most sentences are for all Americans on their first offense (criminally) and Washington is no different.Second, the light sentence tells me there’s quite a bit of background information we’re not privy too. If the Washington incident was unconscionable to the judge, he or she is not accepting the plea agreement of one year of supervised probation. The prosecutor could easily enhance their career by dropping the hammer and yet chose this plea agreement. Usually, that means two things: this was the extent of what the evidence could prove or both sides are working to rectify the situation, making the prosecutor believe the lesson is already learned.This may sound odd but I root for justice. The catch is I fully understand I have no idea what justice is. If the entire incident happened the way Washington’s ex-girlfriend explained in the police report and she was a saint throughout, I think a light sentence is disgusting. If she is not credible and Washington’s involvement is much less than reported, I have so much sympathy for him and wish he would have pleaded to nothing. The truth is somewhere in the middle and, as we all know, only two people really know what happened that night. If I got my wish and the perfect amount of justice was served, the judge and prosecutor did not view this as heinous and we shouldn’t either.last_img read more

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first_imgBeerIcelandic for gold, Gull beer is exactly what it says on the tin. Made with some of the world’s purest water, filtered through volcanic rock, Gull features heavily on the rúntur. Beer is the drink of choice for most Icelanders since the collapse of the economy back in 2008. It’s available on draught in most places but if you’re self-catering, you can buy boxes of Gull (as well as other beers, spirits and wines) at Vínbúðin, state-owned monopolies which have strict opening hours. If vodka is more your tipple, Lebowskis Bar on Laugavegur specialises in a mean White Russian. A hat tip to the Coen Brothers’ cult film, it also does an incredible sirloin beef burger – great with a pint of Gull.Want more local tips on what to see and do in Iceland? Check these out:6 places to see the Aurora Borealis this yearWould you like to see the ‘Northern Lights’, or Aurora Borealis? Viewing these unearthly colours and sounds in the night sky above a snowy Arctic wilderness is on many a bucket list. But how, and where, can you see this phantasmargorical phenomenon?8 incredible photos of Iceland you won’t believe are realFrom black beaches to blue lagoons; Iceland is full of dramatic landscapes and picture-perfect panoramas, making it possibly one of the most beautiful countries in the world.Find flights to IcelandGet a hotel in ReykyavikSkyscanner is the world’s travel search engine, helping your money go further on flights, hotels and car hire.ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map NightlifeIn winter, there’s roughly four hours of daylight. In the summertime, the sun barely dips below the horizon. Either way, it’s an excuse for Icelanders to affirm their reputation as party animals. One third of the 300,000-strong population lives in the Reykjavik area so that’s where you’ll find the pulse of the country’s nightlife. Most of the city’s bars and nightspots line Laugavegur, a long street near the waterfront. It used to be the road which would take the women of Reykjavik to hot springs to do their washing but nowadays, if you find yourself here on a Friday or Saturday night, you’re more likely to run into locals on the rúntur, or round tour, a mass bar crawl from midnight to 4am. Very nearly destroyed by a project to build a dam, Gulfoss is a roaring two-tiered waterfall plunging into a deep canyon further along the route. Whether partially frozen in winter or gushing in spring and summer, it’s a stunning sight in all seasons. Though it’s safer to view from the platform at the top, there is a path down to the water’s edge (blocked off in winter due to ice and still slippery in summer) for a more daredevil, spray-drenching experience. Related8 incredible pictures of Iceland that you won’t believe are realFrom black beaches to blue lagoons; Iceland is full of dramatic landscapes and picture-perfect panoramas, making it possibly one of the most beautiful countries in the world.Best places to see the Northern LightsBest places to see the Northern Lights6 best places to see the Northern LightsIt’s no surprise that glimpsing the Northern Lights tops most people’s bucket lists. The ethereal display of dancing colours is possibly the most-awe-inspiring sight in the world. But like any natural phenomena, the Aurora Borealis is as elusive as it is beautiful. So how can you maximise your chances of…center_img Further afield to the south-east, Landmannalaugar is a hot springs area connected by buses from Reykjavik in the summer. Set in a wild, glacial valley sculpted by Iceland’s second-most active volcano, Hekla, you’ll be able to wade through the stream until you find a warm spot to go for a soak.The Golden CircleWhether you opt for taking an organised tour or getting the testosterone flowing behind the wheel of a 4×4, the Golden Circle encapsulates the beauty of Iceland’s vast lunar landscapes in an afternoon’s drive. Around 90 minutes from Reykjavik lies Geysir, the original water spout that gave it’s name to all others. Geysir is not as active as it once was but often more reliable for some action is Strokkur nearby, which erupts every few minutes or so. Patience is a virtue, even in the biting cold, but you’ll often be well-rewarded for the wait. Hot springsThe most recognisable and enduring image of Iceland, the Blue Lagoon should be on the bucket list of anyone on a break in Europe’s most northerly capital. Said to cure any skin ailment, the lagoon on Reykjanes peninsula was created when heated seawater from a nearby geothermal power plant flowed into a lava field. Now a spa, there are various packages on offer combining entry and scrub masks, or opt just for the basic entry fee and relax in the 37-degree powder blue water with silica mud for your face and skin. There’s also a sauna and steam room to further help with your detox.last_img read more

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first_img by The Associated Press Posted Apr 17, 2019 11:53 pm PDT France to hold daylong tribute to Notre Dame firefighters PARIS — It’s a day of tribute to the Paris firefighters who saved Notre Dame Cathedral from collapse and rescued its treasures from encroaching flames.French President Emmanuel Macron is hosting them for a special gathering on Thursday. Later, Paris City Hall will hold a ceremony in the firefighters’ honour, with a concert, two giant banners and readings from Victor Hugo’s “The Hunchback of Notre Dame.”More than 400 firefighters took part in the nine-hour battle to save the 12th-century Notre Dame on Monday.Among those being honoured Thursday is Paris fire brigade chaplain Jean-Marc Fournier, who helped salvage the crown of thorns believed to have been worn by Jesus.Investigators so far believe the fire was accidental, and are questioning both cathedral staff and workers who were carrying out renovations when the fire broke out.The Associated Press An image made available by Gigarama.ru on Wednesday April 17, 2019 shows an aerial shot of the fire damage to Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on Tuesday April 16. Nearly $1 billion has already poured in from ordinary worshippers and high-powered magnates around the world to restore Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris after it was damaged in a massive fire on Monday. (Gigarama.ru via AP) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Emaillast_img read more

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first_img State Rep. Martin Howrylak, of Troy, today highlighted record state funding across Oakland and Macomb counties and renewed an emphasis on preparing students for the workforce.“Every student should be able to explore all post-high school opportunities,” Howrylak said. “Given Michigan’s ever-increasing need for individuals with the necessary skill set and experience in skilled trades, it is essential we emphasize career preparation in our schools to ensure our students are fully equipped to fill these position openings.”Howrylak’s commitment to students has brought about a significant impact on our local school districts, and he will continue to work towards providing students with the best opportunities possible.Over the past two years in the Michigan House, Howrylak delivered an estimated $10.4 million funding increase for the Oakland and Macomb county school districts he represents. The state’s basic foundation allowance increase this coming school year alone amounts to an estimated $516,617 for Avondale School District, $959,178 for Birmingham City School District, $239,940 for Clawson Public Schools, $1,889,002 for Troy School District and nearly $1,654,211 for Warren Consolidated Schools. This funding increase includes an additional $120 per student this school year. Therefore, every school district in Michigan will receive at least $7,871 per student in the foundation’s allowance this academic year – the largest annual increase in 15 years.Increased state funding will provide schools with aid in other areas as well. In conjunction with the state’s commitment to the Marshall Plan for Talent, $100 million will be allocated to expand and improve skilled trade career opportunities for students. Following the passage of last year’s School Aid Budget, increased funding for students considered at-risk either financially or academically will be provided to early literacy and special education programs. Additionally, $25 million is to be set aside statewide for grants to improve building security and expand the highly successful OK2SAY school safety tip reporting system.“Our children are our state’s future, and their success is our success,” Howrylak said. “Because of the record funding we were able to approve, we are able to prepare a better foundation for our students, which will ultimately lead to a better tomorrow for all Michiganders.” 30Aug Rep. Howrylak: Students begin school backed by record funding, heightened emphasis on career prep Categories: Howrylak Newslast_img read more

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first_imgShare2TweetShareEmail2 SharesCC BY-SA 3.0, LinkMay 5, 2017; New York TimesThe relationship between the City of New York and the Metropolitan Museum of Art precludes its charging a mandatory fee for admission. Instead, it asks each patron for a “recommended” contribution of $25. That’s because the city owns the building that houses the Met and gives the museum around $26 million each year in tax dollars.Lawsuits filed over the past few years have challenged the museum for not being clearer about the voluntary nature of that charge. The resulting settlement, confirmed last week, requires that the museum state clearly on its signs and websites that the amount visitors pay is up to them and to describe the $25 entry charge as “suggested” rather than “recommended.” As a result, the museum has filed a formal proposal with the city to establish a mandatory admission fee to out-of-state visitors. In-state visitors would continue to be charged a voluntary fee.Lawyers for the plaintiffs in the original suits take issue with this new wrinkle. Michael S. Hiller argued in court that the measure would violate a 1893 state law that requires that the museum’s collections “shall be kept open and accessible to the public free of all charge throughout the year.”“The court would be authorizing the museum to charge an admission fee,” Mr. Hiller said, adding that this would “violate that law.”It’s unclear that the measure would be a sure road to additional sustainable revenue, since some believe it might place the city’s $26 million in annual public support at some kind of risk. Mayor Bill de Blasio says the change would not necessarily mean less revenue from the city—but that “not necessarily” should be seen as an important qualifier.The recommended fee generated about $39 million in FY 2016, and museum officials believe there might be tens of millions more in that pot with this requested change, but the potential loss of a guaranteed amount may in the end weigh too heavily on the other side of the scale.—Ruth McCambridgeShare2TweetShareEmail2 Shareslast_img read more

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first_imgShare27Tweet11ShareEmail38 SharesCredit: Ryan BasilioJune 27, 2018; New York Times“When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.”—Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking GlassThe American labor movement, as we have noted regularly in NPQ, faces hard times. Given the Supreme Court’s 5–4 conservative majority, few expected unions to prevail in the case of Janus v. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees —and they did not.Indeed, the decision was widely anticipated by many publications, including NPQ.The decision’s predictability, however, does not mean the ruling is sensible. Nor will the consequences be trivial. Women, who are 57 percent of all state and local government employees, and Black workers, who are 30 percent more likely to be employed in the public sector than whites, will likely be the most heavily affected.According to Justice Samuel Alito’s opinion for the Court majority (Roberts, Thomas, Kennedy, and Gorsuch concurring), forcing workers covered by a union contract to pay fees to the union that negotiated that contract “violates the free speech rights of nonmembers by compelling them to subsidize private speech on matters of substantial public concern.” As a result, payment of union dues in the public sector will be entirely voluntary, hurting union finances, diminishing unions’ ability to advocate on behalf of their members for better wages and working conditions, and, of course, for the nonprofit sector, reinforcing wage ghettoes by making it harder for workers to climb out of them.The case, notes Adam Liptak in the New York Times, was brought by Mark Janus, a child support specialist who works for the state government in Illinois. Janus felt “harmed” because he was forced to pay a union agency fee of $535 a year. As Alito notes, according to the Court’s 1977 Abood opinion, states could pass labor laws that allowed unions to negotiate contracts, according to which employees “who decline to join the union are not as­sessed full union dues but must instead pay what is gen­erally called an ‘agency fee,’” a percent­age of full union dues. Until now, 23 states plus Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia had public-sector agency fees. In Janus’s case, his agency fee was about 78 percent of full union dues. In essence, under Abood, nonmembers must cover bargaining and service expenses but not the costs of advocacy and lobbying.Like many Court decisions of the 1970s (remember Bakke, anyone?), the decision was a compromise. One could reasonably argue that advocacy is a core part of union work and that anyone who is covered by a union contract should have to pay for that, too.One question the Court failed to ask is what Janus got for his $535 a year. But Donnie Killen, a workplace colleague, did. Killen found that Janus received $17,000 in raises during his tenure. (If that counts as harm, we could use a little more of it.)Of course, Janus would have received some of that $17,000 without a union—but surely less of it. Indeed, a 2015 study from the Economic Policy Institute found that workers in public sector unions in states where agency fees are not collected earn nine percentage points less than workers in public sectors in states where agency fees are collected. In other words, a person earning $50,000 in a “right-to-work” state could be expected, on average, to earn $54,500 if only she worked in a state with union agency fees. Taking the $535 that Janus paid as being roughly typical, the $4,500 for $535 trade-off is, to put it mildly, not bad. As economist Jeffrey Keefe explains, “From a cost-benefit perspective, paying dues or agency fees is economically rational since benefits exceed costs.”And union gains don’t just benefit union workers. As this chart shows, over the past century, when union membership rises, income inequality falls; by contrast, when union membership falls, income inequality rises. Correlation is not causation, but what is beyond dispute—indeed, Alito’s opinion anticipates this—is that eliminating agency fees in the public sector is highly likely to reduce the number of union members.Of course, union gains do not happen magically. Chris Maisano in Jacobin notes that renewed labor militancy could offset the negative impact of the Janus decision on workers. It’s possible that the organizations that financed the Janus effort may find their victory to be Pyrrhic. After all, 2018’s education spring and the #RedforEd protests were marked by militant walkouts of teachers in the right-to-work states of Kentucky, Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Arizona.As for the Court, there are some interesting dicta in Alito’s opinion. For example, Alito writes that “compelling individuals to mouth support for views they find objectionable violates cardinal constitutional command,” but the Court has supported precisely that if unions are not involved. For example, in Garcetti v. Ceballos, five conservative justices found that “a deputy district attorney who faced retaliation for writing an internal memo detailing false claims in a search warrant did not have free-speech rights, because of his position as a government worker.” Another interesting comment is where Alito questions whether the government could compel payment for a service, apparently forgetting that the Court upheld an individual mandate for health insurance back in 2012. (But who remembers that case?)What takes the cake, though, is the obliteration of stare decisis, a legal term for “let it stand.” The idea is that the Court accepts precedent to avoid legal chaos. So, when can precedent be overturned? Alito writes, “An important factor…is the quality of its reasoning.” In other words, if five Justices disagree, stare decisis begone! Humpty Dumpty could not have done better.—Steve DubbShare27Tweet11ShareEmail38 Shareslast_img read more

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first_imgSwisscom recorded a year-on-year 55.3% rise in subscribers to its Swisscom TV platform to end September with 556,000 subscribers, including about 17,000 enterprise customers.The company had a total of 1.635 million retail broadband customers in Switzerland at the end of the third quarter, up 5.3% year-on-year.The company said it had seen strong take up of its Vivo Casa triple-play offering, and had launched a quad-play service, Vivo Tutto, in August.Fixed-line losses over the year to September reached 124,000, or 3.8%, which Swisscom attributed to competition from cable.Residential revenue from Swiss operations amounted to CHF1.291 billion (€1.041 billion) for the quarter, down 3.3%.Swisscom’s Italian subsidiary Fastweb saw quarterly net revenues fall by 10.6% year-on-year to €420 million, with sales of products to residential customers falling sharply, partly as a result of the introduction of stricter credit checks.Litigation with a rival telecom provider was settled in September, resulting in 197,000 customers being transferred to the other provider. Fastweb ended the year to September with 1.56 million residential broadband customers, up 45,000 year-on-year excluding the transfer. Fastweb had signed up a total of 37,000 customers to its new bundled satellite TV and broadband offering with Sky Italia by the end of September, including 18,000 signed up in the third quarter.Swisscom posted revenues of CHF8.5 billion for the first nine months of the year, down 4.9%, and net income of CHF1.5 billion, up 8.4%.last_img read more

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