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first_imgPuducherry: The opposition AINRC on Tuesday submitted a notice to the Puducherry Assembly Secretary for moving a ‘no confidence’ motion against Speaker V P Sivakolundhu. AINRC Chief and former Puducherry Chief Minister N Rangasamy who handed over the notice, told reporters that the Speaker was participating in Congress sponsored meetings and hence would not discharge his dutiesin an “impartial andnon partisan” manner. AIADMK legislature party leader A Anbalagan along with his party legislators accompanied Rangasamy when he submitted the notice to the Secretary of the Assembly A Vincent Rayar. Anbalagan told PTI that he had not signed the notice and only accompanied Rangasamy at the latter’s request to meet the Secretary to hand over the notice of no confidence against the Speaker. AINRC has a strength of seven members while the AIADMK has four. The total strength of the House is 30 (elected) and three (nominated members).last_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsThe term “redskins” is no different than the N-word says an Ottawa man who has filed a human rights complaint to get a local football team to change its name.The complaint was filed by Ian Campeau with the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal against the Nepean Redskins Football Club who for years has fought criticism over its name.“The players call each other ‘redskins’ on the field,” said Campeau, an Ojibway in a press release. “How are they going to differentiate the playing field from the school yard? What’s going to stop them from calling my daughter a redskin in the school yard? That’s as offensive as using the n-word.”Campeau, a member of the popular Indigenous DJ group A Tribe Called Red, is not seeking money but the name to be changed and the tribunal to force the club to do so.He has proposed a five-year period to phase in a new name and logo.Campeau said he reached out to the club but got no response.News of his complaint quickly spread on social media where Campeau defended his action.“It’s called systemic socially acceptable racial oppression. It’s marginalizing and stereotyping by race. It’s racist,” said Campeau in response to critics on Twitter.He has the support of the Assembly of First Nations, Native Women’s Association of Canada and Borden Ladner Gervais LLP has agreed to take his case pro bono.“Our preference always is to work together to reach respectful outcomes and it is unfortunate that this step must be taken as a last resort. It is time to banish the term ‘redskins,’” said National Chief Shawn Atleo in a release.last_img read more

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first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – The nation’s most powerful banker, JPMorgan Chase’s Chief Executive Jamie Dimon, caused a stir Wednesday when he said he would be able to beat President Donald Trump in an election.Dimon immediately walked backed those comments and said he isn’t running for the nation’s top office.Dimon, a brash Wall Street executive with a history of making off-the-cuff remarks, told reporters at an event at JPMorgan headquarters Wednesday that “I think I could beat Trump.”In the remarks, first reported by the business network CNBC, Dimon also said he is just as tough as Trump and smarter than the president. Further, Dimon made comments that his wealth was earned, and not given to him by his father, another jab at Trump.Shortly after the event ended, Dimon released a statement saying he shouldn’t have made the comments and indicating they were prompted by frustration over Washington gridlock on important issues.“I get frustrated because I want all sides to come together to help solve big problems,” Dimon said, adding that he’s not running for president.Dimon has a mixed relationship with President Trump. The banking executive fully supported President Trump’s corporate tax cuts that passed late last year, but has expressed frustration with the White House’s positions on immigration and trade.Dimon, 62, is chairman of the Business Roundtable, a powerful lobbying group that represents the CEOs of the nation’s largest corporations, and is often seen as a voice for American business.last_img read more

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Rabat – The contract entered into effect on November 1 and will continue through October 31, 2019.Algeria hired David Keene, a former president of the National Rifle Association (NRA) to lobby against Morocco in the Western Sahara issue. Keene told Al-Monitor that he “will work on issues related to the disputed  Western Sahara as well as military and defense cooperation,” as part of the one-year contract with his firm. According to the contract signed between Keene Consulting firm and the Algerian government, which was obtained by Morocco World News, Keene “shall provide counsel to and conduct lobbying activities# for Algeria to reinforce friendship relations and cooperation between Algeria and the US.Some of the activities include mobilization of “non-governmental organizational, public and media support for Algeria,” and “enhancing Algeria’s image” in the US.Under the agreement, Keene will regularly have in-person and telephone contact with Algeria’s Ambassador to the US Madjid Bouguerra.Similar lobbying affair in 2006-2007Keene had a similar lobbying job for Algeria between 2006 and 2007 on behalf of the Carmen Group, a lobbying firm in Washington, DC. Keene was responsible for managing the firm’s services for Algeria.According to Washington Post, the Carmen Group worked to strengthen the US-Algeria relations and expand trade, through government relations and “strategic advice.”The group was also in charge of projecting “an up-to-date image of Algeria’ and promote congressional, public and media support for ‘Algeria’s legitimate interests and policy goals,’” Washington Post reported on July 6, 2006.An old friend of BoltonKeene has a close friendship with President Donald Trump’s national security adviser, John Bolton. Keene’s friendship with Bolton first made him seriously interested in Western Sahara and Sahrawis.The former NRA’s chief told Al-Monitor that Bolton first put him in contact with Algerian and Polisario officials. Polisario is an Algeria-funded group which has been in conflict with Morocco over Western Sahara since 1976. Backed by Algeria, Polisario’s main goal is to take over Western Sahara.Keene said he visited the Tindouf camps in Algeria in 2000 and became “very good friends” with Mohamed Abdelaziz, the former Polisario leader, according to Al Monitor.“My daughter was over there as a volunteer in the camp for about six or eight months in the early 2000s, and I had hosted [Bolton] when he came here and we developed a friendship,” Keene said.In 2011, Keene appointed Bolton to the NRA’s international affairs subcommittee.While Algeria has long claimed it is not a party to the Western Sahara conflict, this is the second contract it has signed with a lobbying firm in Washington D.C. to help thwart Morocco’s efforts to put an end to this territorial dispute. In addition to Keene Consulting, Algeria has been linked since 2007 with lobbying firm Foley Hoag, which undertakes lobbying activities in the US administration and both houses of Congress on behalf the Algerian government. According to Al Monitor, Foley Hoag activities focus on members of the Senate who are sympathetic to the Polisario, such as senator James Inhofe (republican representing Oklahoma), who visited the Tindouf camps in 2017. read more

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“The crisis in South Kordofan has reached a critical point,” Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Valerie Amos said in a statement on the state where the UN has already said crimes against humanity and war crimes may have been perpetrated in fighting between Government forces and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army North (SPLA-N).“Essential supplies have been completely depleted in many parts of South Kordofan, leaving many people in a life-threatening situation without any prospect of relief,” she added, voicing alarm that Government authorities last week cancelled an essential humanitarian assessment mission to the region after denying permission to international agencies to replenish stocks and deploy personnel for the past six weeks.“Unless there is an immediate stop to the fighting, and humanitarian organizations are granted immediate and unhindered independent access throughout South Kordofan, people in many parts of the State face potentially catastrophic levels of malnutrition and mortality.”Ms. Amos welcomed the recent distribution of relief supplies in the state capital, Kadugli, but voiced concern that other parts of Southern Kordofan remain cut off, with more than 200,000 people affected by recent fighting prevented from receiving aid. “The Government of Sudan and the SPLM-N must lift restrictions on humanitarian organizations so they can provide timely and effective assistance to people in need,” she concluded. “Unless aid is delivered in sufficient quantities now, the consequences will be severe.”Southern Kordofan borders newly independent South Sudan, which seceded from Sudan on 9 July.Earlier this month, a preliminary report, produced jointly by the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the former UN Mission in Sudan (UNMIS), described a wide range of alleged violations of international law in Kadugli and the surrounding Nuba mountains.Reported violations included “extrajudicial killings, arbitrary arrests and illegal detention, enforced disappearances, attacks against civilians, looting of civilian homes and destruction of property,” as well as massive displacement, according to an OHCHR news release.High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said that while the report was preliminary it suggested that what was happening was so serious that “it is essential there is an independent, thorough and objective inquiry with the aim of holding perpetrators to account.” The report, which covers the period from 5 to 30 June, also described aerial bombardments on civilian areas in Kadugli and elsewhere in Southern Kordofan, which, it says, have resulted in “significant loss of life.” UNMIS ended after South Sudan’s independence and has been replaced by the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), which does not have a mandate to operate in Sudan. 30 August 2011More than 200,000 people affected by recent fighting in Sudan’s Southern Kordofan state face potentially catastrophic levels of malnutrition and mortality after the Government’s refusal to let aid agencies replenish stocks and deploy personnel, the United Nations warned today. read more

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The Force conjointe du G5 Sahel (FC-G5S) was established by the Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and Niger – the Group of Five for the Sahel (G5 Sahel) – to jointly combat terrorism and transnational organized crime in the region.In the resolution adopted today, the 15-member Security Council welcomed progress achieved in the operationalization of the FC-G5S and underlined the need for FC-G5S operations to be conducted in full compliance with international law, including international humanitarian, human rights and refugee laws, as applicable.The Council further stressed the need to ensure that the gender perspective is taken into account in implementing all aspects of the strategic concept of FC-G5S operations, including by ensuring that gender analysis and women’s participation are integrated into assessments, planning and operations.Also in the resolution, the Security Council requested the Secretary-General to take appropriate steps to conclude a technical agreement between the UN, the European Union (EU) and G5 Sahel States, to provide specified operational and logistical support through MINUSMA to the FC-G5S.The support provided pursuant to the technical agreement should “be conducted at the discretion of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Mali and Head of MINUSMA, in close consultation with the Force Commander, and without affecting MINUSMA’s capacity to implement its mandate and strategic priorities, and be restricted to the areas of operations of MINUSMA where such support is compatible with its current level of capacities,” added the resolution.Also in the resolution, the Council expressed its deep concern over the “persistent delays” in the full implementation of key provisions of the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali and renewed its “urgent call” on the Government of Mali and the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups to take immediate and concrete action to fully and expeditiously deliver on their remaining obligations under the Agreement. read more

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first_imgMDM Engineering Group has received a Letter of Intent for the award of the detailed engineering and execution phase for a 2.4 Mt/y gold plant for African Barrick Gold’s (ABG) Bulyanhulu process plant expansion project in Tanzania. ABG is the largest gold producer in Tanzania with a portfolio of four operating mines and is the operator and manager of the Bulyanhulu gold mine, which is wholly owned by Bulyanhulu Gold Mine Ltd, a 100% owned subsidiary of ABG.A concentrator plant has been in operation at Bulyanhulu since commissioning in 2001. During 2010, ABG completed a scoping study to determine the technical and economic viability of reclaiming and processing the stored tailings for recovery of gold and in August 2011 engaged MDM to undertake a bankable feasibility study into the project. MDM successfully completed the bankable feasibility study in December 2011 followed by value engineering in March and April 2012. MDM will now execute the project which includes construction of a new 2.4 Mt/y carbon in leach facility to process tailings reclaimed from the historical tailings concurrently with current flotation tailings. The detailed engineering has commenced in order to maintain the project completion schedule.George Bennett, MDM Executive Director said: “MDM is thrilled to be working on the Bulyanhulu gold project in Tanzania. MDM will be able to bring the experience of the team’s 35 gold plants designed and built across Africa to date, including two 650 t/mth tailings plants built in the last three years. We look forward to a long working relationship with African Barrick Gold.”last_img read more

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first_imgEVERY MORNING, TheJournal.ie brings you the nine stories, just a little before nine, that you need to know with your morning coffee.1.#CRASH: Northern Ireland’s richest man Edward Haughey, a former member of Seanad Eireann, has died in a helicopter crash. Haughey was one of four people killed after a helicopter crashed in Norfolk in England.2.#RIP: The veteran British Labour Party MP Tony Benn has died. The left-wing campaigner was a supporter of a united Ireland. He was 88.3.#MH370: The US Navy has sent a second ship to help in the search for the missing Malaysian Airlines plane. The US now believes that the plane could have come down in the Indian Ocean.4.#ERRORS: Over €3 million has been sent “down the drain” after a plan to build new offices for the State Pathologist were scrapped. The Public Accounts Committee was told the plan was a “comedy of errors”.5.#SHOOTING: Two men were injured in a shooting in Ballyfermot last night. The men, one in his 20s and one aged 53, were shot at a house in Clifden Drive in Ballyfermot.6.#CHARITIES: A new survey has found that 90 per cent of people who give to charity regularly are less trusting of organisations. The survey shows that people are more alert to the behind-the-scenes workings of charities they give to.7.#MIGRANTS: As Irish politicians make the case for amnesty for illegal citizens abroad, the Immigrant Council of Ireland says the same must be done here. The Migrants Rights Centre Ireland says that government’s silence on migrants plights is “deafening”.8.#NETWORKING: Six TDs and one MEP will today launch a ‘loose’ alliance. The Independents’ Network aims to encourage and assist independents to contest at local government level. Their website will carry information for those looking to run in this years elections.9.#THEY’RE OFF: The Taoiseach and Tánaiste are in Washington and Paris today, as the traditional St Patrick’s Day diplomatic visits get underway. Gilmore will spend three days in the French capital, meeting French President Francois Hollande.last_img read more

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first_img Lance Armstrong is a feature of this week’s episode. By Gavin Cooney Tuesday 27 Aug 2019, 12:00 PM 8,715 Views 2 Comments Share Tweet Email Lance Armstrong is a feature of this week’s episode. https://the42.ie/4783370 center_img EPISODE FOUR OF Behind The Lines, our sportswriting podcast exclusive to The42 members, is available now.If you’re unaware – each episode features a lengthy interview with one of the best sports writers working in the English language. Each guest brings along a few of their favourite pieces as a way to discuss sport, writing and sportswriting.To get access to our back catalogue along with this week’s episode, become a member of The42 for €5 per month – or just €42 for a full year – by following this link.This week’s guest is the former Sunday Times sports editor, Alan English. Now the Editorial Director at Iconic Newspapers having earlier served as editor of the Limerick Leader.He moved home after working at the Sunday Times, a role which brought him into contact with some of the biggest names, events and controversies in sport. He has also written a number of books on rugby, and ghosted the autobiographies of Brian O’Driscoll and Paul O’Connell.Here we weave our way through some of the stand-out moments from Alan’s career, including his role in David Walsh and The Sunday Times’ pursuit of Lance Armstrong.There’s a teaser below, as he recalls the scene after the paper’s lawyers nixed one of Walsh’s pieces on Armstrong:   Episode 4 of the Behind The Lines podcast – featuring Alan English – is out now The former Sunday Times sports editor joins us on the latest edition of the show. Short URL Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Aug 27th 2019, 7:31 AM Source: The42 Podcasts/SoundCloudWe hope you enjoy it, and you can get in touch with the show by emailing behindthelines@the42.ie.- Originally published at 07.30last_img read more

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first_img U.S. national parks are experiencing unsanitary campgrounds and littered landscapes due to the partial government shutdown.This week, more than 25 percent of federal government employees are working without a paycheck or not working at all, leaving national parks, including Joshua Tree National Park and Yosemite National Park, with limited staff to clean facilities, CNN reported.Joshua Tree National Park, which is located in California, will stay open during the shutdown. However, the National Park Service closed the Joshua Tree campgrounds at 12 p.m. on Wednesday over health and safety concerns.Campgrounds in the park will be closed effective noon Wednesday, January 2nd. The park is being forced to take this action for health and safety concerns as vault toilets reach capacity. Indian Cove and Black Rock campgrounds will be open for day-use only, sunrise to sunset.— Joshua Tree NPS (@JoshuaTreeNPS) December 31, 2018On Sunday, Yosemite National Park also closed their campgrounds due to “lack of restrooms” and “resulting impacts from human waste.” Trash collection was also stopped, leaving parts of the national park stinky and unmaintained for visitors.Hetch Hetchy and Mariposa Grove are now closed due to lack of restrooms and resulting impacts from human waste. People entering closed areas are being cited. https://t.co/OXlp1YQkGO— Yosemite National Park (@YosemiteNPS) December 30, 2018With no sign of the government shutdown ending, American national parks are left severely understaffed and uncleaned. Plus, the National Park Service website will not be updated, leaving visitors in the dark about campground re-openings.“Due to the federal government shutdown, this website will not be updated and may not reflect current conditions,” said a statement on the National Park Service website. “For most parks, there will be no National Park Service-provided visitor services, such as restrooms, trash collection, facilities, or road maintenance.”For more information on U.S. national parks partial closures, visit the National Park Service’s Twitter account here.More on Geek.com:NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Spacecraft Breaks Space Exploration Record‘Cute Aggression’ Is Triggered by Baby Animals, Researchers SayTexas Coast Has More Ocean Trash Than Any Other Gulf State, Study Says Stay on target Watch: Dolphin Leaps Feet Away From Unsuspecting SurferNASA Says 2 Asteroids Will Safely Fly By Earth This Weekend last_img read more

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first_imgOn the WebCommunity Foundation for Southwest Washingtonwww.cfsww.orgGrass roots generosity in Southwest Washington went digital in a big way this week, with individual donors at every level clicking their way to $431,994.69 in gifts to local nonprofit and charitable agencies. Of that amount, $338,994.69 was pledged by people who visited a special website hosted by the Community Foundation for Southwest Washington, and $93,000 more was in matching gifts, prizes and other incentives that were anted up by local businesses and philanthropists.The 24-hour period from 7 a.m. Thursday to 7 a.m. Friday was christened “Give More 24!” by the Community Foundation, which invested in new technology in order to create a website where donors could choose individual charities or search by program area, make secure online donations — and then watch totals mount all day long.Charities involved in the effort also hosted fun activities during the day to energize the community.There was a day-long carnival at Share, free ballet at Columbia Dance, charity bowling at Big Al’s, a barnstorming band bus and lots more.“Everyone was talking about it,” said Community Foundation President Jennifer Rhoads. “There was definitely a buzz, a good feeling in our community.”There were 1,842 individual donations benefitting 85 different nonprofit agencies in Clark, Cowlitz and Skamania counties, according to a final Friday morning wrap-up from the Community Foundation. In addition to the local region, donations also came in from 28 other states and one foreign country.last_img read more

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first_imgAntje Hensel-Roth has joined asset management firm Intermediate Capital Group (ICG) as head of human resources.Hensel-Roth, who has nearly 15 years of experience in the global asset management industry, will report in to ICG’s chief financial and operating officer, Philip Keller. She will look to help drive global growth and innovation at the organisation.Previously, Hensel-Roth worked as managing director, global co-head of investment management at executive search and leadership consulting organisation Russell Reynolds Associates. She has also worked at Spencer Stuart and AT Kearney in financial services practice roles.last_img read more

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first_imgMaharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis on Thursday threatened to “initiate proceedings of criminal defamation” over the charge of holding up an Air India flight recently even as the Centre regretted such incidents, with the second one allegedly involving Minister of State for Home Affairs Kiren Rijiju.Amid reports of the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) seeking details of the two successive incidents, Civil Aviation Minister Ashok Gajapati Raju on Thursday evening regretted such episodes and assured that it would not happen again.Raju said he had called for an investigation into the matter pertaining to Rijiju and was waiting for the report before initiating action. He did not elaborate what action the government might take.”I have called in for information. But since people have been inconvenienced, I as the civil aviation minister of this country offer my apologies. Let the first reports come in. Let us know the truth and I will do my duty,” Raju told reporters at a press conference.”These things routinely happen with all the airlines, not just Air India. In fact, they have been operating on time and serving the Indian skies well,” Raju said next, apparently to play down the two incidents, both involving national flag carrier Air India.PMO seeks report The minister’s reaction came after the PMO sought a report from the civil aviation ministry on the delay of two Air India flights due to the VIPs on board.Raju, however, clarified that his ministry had not received any formal order from the PMO yet and it was “in public knowledge”. He, however, added that it was “expected soon”.”PMOIndia asks Ministry of Civil Aviation for a report on delay in #AirIndia flights on account of VIP travels in the recent past,” Press Information Bureau chief Frank Noronha tweeted earlier in the day.Enough is enough, says Fadnavis Meanwhile, Fadnavis reacted to the developments on his Twitter account denying reports of him delaying the flight through a series of posts.”I reiterate,the reports of me delaying flight are misleading.Infact when I’d already boarded how can I say I wont travel without delegation?,” Fadnavis, who landed at Seattle airport earlier in the day as part of his over a week-long business trip to the US, tweeted.”If at all any report that has been submitted, states that I refused to travel without my delegation then it is a blatant lie because… passengers sitting besides & behind me are witness that I was sitting quietly waiting for departure. Not even once I asked to offload me,” the chief minister said in his next two posts.”Enough is enough. Once I m back to India I will initiate proceedings of criminal defamation,” Fadnavis said in his last post on Twitter on the issue.Enough is enough. Once I m back to India I will initiate proceedings of criminal defamation.— Devendra Fadnavis (@Dev_Fadnavis) July 2, 2015The controversy The controversy was triggered after three passengers were reportedly taken off a flight to New Delhi from Leh to accommodate Rijiju and an aide last week.Rijiju, however, clarified on Thursday that he was unaware that the Air India flight was delayed and some passengers had to de-board to accommodate him and his aide.Earlier, an Air India flight from Mumbai to New York, with Fadnavis on board, was reportedly delayed by nearly an hour allegedly to accommodate a member of his entourage. The chief minister has since been denying any such hold-up.last_img read more

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first_imgAvid fishermen from Ladysmith would be interested to know about Sterkfontein Dam, which is on 77.6%.There are still a few dams in the KZN region that are battling and are currently the lowest in KZN from the readings that were taken this week.Hluhluwe Dam is on 37.1% and Albert Falls Dam 33.4%.The dam that is the lowest in KZN is Goedertrouw Dam, currently on a very low 30%.Click to receive news links via WhatsApp. Or  for the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there! WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite Currently, Ladysmith’s Spioenkop Dam and other dams surrounding town are looking much better than a few months ago.The levels of all the dams surrounding Ladysmith have picked up dramatically due to the rains that have fallen during the past month.The latest dam level readings taken this week either show an increase or have remained the same as last week.Also read: Current water levels in Spioenkop and dams surrounding LadysmithAlso read: Spioenkop Dam at 101% fullThe Driel Barrage Dam stayed the same as last week, sitting on 87.2%.Spioenkop Dam showed a slight decrease from 101.1% to 100.6% this week.Woodstock Dam in Bergville stayed the same on 100.4%.last_img read more

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first_img Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Recent Videos View all 606 items Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology View all 220 items Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Technology Reports View all 9 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Siemens showcased multiple technologies and software solutions at SNM 2010, all designed to increase patient safety and clinician productivity. “Minimum Dose and Maximum Speed” solutions included IQ-SPECT for routine nuclear cardiology studies done at half the dose and at twice the speed, and IRIS (Iterative Reconstruction in Image Space) for CT technology that allows clinicians to image using 60% less dose with no compromise to image quality. Additionally, Siemens showcased its new syngo.via client server advanced visualization software platform designed specifically for PET/CT multi-modality applications, and symbia.net, a cost-effective client server for reading SPECT and SPECT/CT images. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Women’s Health View all 62 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Videos | March 22, 2011 Siemens – Dose/Speed Solutions Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. last_img read more

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first_imgPresident Laura Chinchilla on Tuesday swore in Edgar Ayales as finance minister in a brief ceremony at Casa Presidencial, in the southeastern San José district of Zapote.Ayales will focus on containing public spending, boosting foreign investment and improving tax collection, Chinchilla said. He will also push for new laws to reign in government spending and curb the country’s growing fiscal deficit, following a failed fiscal reform package promoted by the president.“As finance minister, I want to build bridges and find solutions,” Ayales said. “Although it is now harder to reach consensus, I hope to reconcile combative positions, and with my contribution, to give the country a little bit back of what it has given to me and my family. The challenge is big, but I can contribute to achieving these objectives in the two remaining years of this administration,” he said.Ayales’ experience includes designing macroeconomic programs for Central American countries, and participation on the boards of international organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank. He also was deputy director of the IMF’s Statistics Department for more than a decade.He replaces Fernando Herrero, who resigned April 2 amid a scandal over alleged tax evasion and insider deals with government institutions. Facebook Comments No related posts.last_img read more

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first_img September 24, 2015 428 Views Share Asset Management Freddie Mac The Collingwood Group 2015-09-24 Seth Welborn             Paul MullingsThe Collingwood Group, a Washington, D.C.-based business advisory firm, announced that Paul Mullings has joined the company as a managing director supporting the firm in business advisory and risk management and compliance practices.Mullings served as SVP of Single-Family Business at Freddie Mac prior to joining the Collingwood Group. In that role, Mullings managed Freddie Mac’s single-family line of business and became well-recognized for his commitment to enhancing customer experience, improving relationships with seller/servicers, investors and dealers, and strengthening the Freddie Mac’s market relevance.”Paul’s excellent reputation comes from 30 years of extensive industry experience, working with participants from all segments of the market as well as government regulators. His background, breadth of knowledge, and relationships with investors, lenders, servicers, and other stakeholders make him an invaluable addition to our team,” said Tim Rood, Chairman of the Collingwood Group. “His leadership in the industry will clearly benefit our clients, helping them to think strategically about the many challenges facing our industry.””Paul’s excellent reputation comes from 30 years of extensive industry experience, working with participants from all segments of the market as well as government regulators.”Before joining Freddie Mac, Mullings served as SVP for JPMorgan Chase, where he re-established the multibillion dollar Private Label Mortgage-backed Securitization Program. At JPMorgan, Mullings was responsible for formalizing, strengthening, and managing the bank’s relationships with Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and other government agencies.”I was attracted to The Collingwood Group because of their very positive reputation in the industry, the impressive list of Principals at the firm and their demonstrated commitment to provide strategic value to stakeholders in the mortgage industry,” said Mullings. “I look forward to helping Collingwood’s clients manage their relationships with the GSEs and regulators.”center_img in Government, Headlines, News, Servicing Collingwood Group Hires Former Freddie Mac Executivelast_img read more

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first_img asking price Competition Home price Homebuyers homes HOUSING Housing Markets Redfin 2018-07-24 Radhika Ojha July 24, 2018 733 Views The 10 Most Competitive Housing Markets Are … The one thing consistent across the housing market board this past couple of years has been that tight inventory has led to strong competition for houses. But where exactly are the most and least competitive markets in the country?A new report by Redfin found the most competitive markets in the West, while the least is a grab bag of metros mostly throughout the South, Southwest, and Midwest.Fremont and San Jose, California, and Seattle are the most competitive U.S. cities for homebuyers, according to the Redfin Compete Score. The score ranks markets on a scale of 0 to 100 for competitiveness level and ranked there three metros as solid 100s.Apart from Aurora, Colorado, and Boston, all the markets with scores above 90 were cities in California or Washington. The common denominator for these states is tech companies.“Many of the most competitive cities are tech hubs that have attracted an influx of people moving to the area for jobs, unmatched by the creation of new homes,” said Taylor Marr, Senior Economist at Redfin. “This has led to intense competition and rising home prices. In San Francisco, Seattle, and Denver homes have become so expensive that many people are moving elsewhere in search of more affordable and less competitive housing markets.”According to Redfin, some homes in these markets are closing for as much as $150,000 above asking price.For those looking at less cutthroat housing markets, there’s New Orleans, the country’s least competitive, according to Redfin. The Big Easy scored a 43 on the Compete Score. Three other cities, El Paso, Pittsburgh, and Miami, also had competitiveness scores in the 40s.Caren Morgan, a Redfin agent in New Orleans, said she often works with people relocating to New Orleans, who are relieved to find homes with much less drama.“That said, bidding wars aren’t uncommon, especially in the hottest parts of the city,” Morgan said. “But we typically see two or three competing offers, and they rarely go much above the asking price.” Redfin also broke down competitiveness in neighborhoods. The most competitive neighborhoods are in Seattle, where several areas earned a 100 score.Two neighborhoods, in Poipu, Hawaii, and West Palm Beach, Florida., scored a 1. These noncompetitive markets are among the most high-end properties in the country.center_img Share in Daily Dose, Data, Featured, Newslast_img read more

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first_img Related7 places to see amazing Christmas trees: in picturesCheck out these seven of the world’s top tinselled trees to get you in the Christmas mood.6 flights for £50 or less6 flights for £50 or lessEurowings baggage restrictions explained and how to maximise your hand luggage allowanceWondering how much cabin luggage you can take with you on a Eurowings flight? How about their excess baggage fees? Here’s our guide to Eurowings’s luggage restrictions, including details on weight, size and fees, so you know which ticket to book and how to get the biggest baggage allowance for… Photo Credit: ©TMB-Fotoarchiv/Winkelmann/SPSG2. Visit the Brandenburg Christmas MarketsIn Brandenburg an Havel, the Christmas Market season kicks off on November 22nd with gluhwein, pretzels and fairy lights by the dozen. In Neustädtischer Markt you can shop for Christmas presents, new wooly hats and brittle wreath or egg cookies for your own Christmas kitchen. There’s even more fun in Cottbus, with a ferris wheel, merry-go-rounds and craft stalls under the 1000 Moravian stars (that’s literally what this Christmas market is called – Weihnachtsmarkt der tausend Sterne!). In Postdam, you can enjoy the historic sites and streets of the “Blauer Lichterglanz” Christmas market. Alternatively, you can also enjoy punting tours even in the coldest season of the year and enjoy “Spreewald Christmas” in Lehde. Photo Credit:©TMB-Fotoarchiv/Frank IhlowWant to find out more about Brandenburg? Visit Brandenburg TourismOn adventure around Berlin? Check these spots out:The top 10 most beautiful hotels in BerlinNumber 1 has artworks featured in every room, and 25Hours Hotel has in-room hammocks.A local’s guide to BerlinWhere to eat, sleep and shop in the hipster capital of Europe.The 10 best places to visit in GermanyFrom cutting-edge art collections to fairytale castles, feast your eyes on these 10 must-visit German destinations.Skyscanner is the world’s travel search engine, helping your money go further on flights, hotels and car hire. Photo Credit: ©TMB-Fotoarchiv/Steffen Lehmann7. Swimming with Penguins in Spreewelten Bad LübbenauEver swam with a penguin before? The whole family has the chance to in Spreewelten Bad Lübbenau. These inquisitive little folks will play alongside you, following hand movements or bright colours, only separated by a glass wall. Make sure you visit at 11.00 am and 3.30 pm for feeding times. Learn more about the penguin pools here. If you don’t fancy playing with penguins, there’s a spa on site with a massage parlour too. The mud and thermal baths are also favourite for a short weekend break. How to get to Spreewelten Bad Lübbenau from Berlin: 1 hour and 23 minutes by car ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map In partnership with EurowingsBest things to do in Brandenburg:Sanssouci Palace, PotsdamCecilienhof Palace, PotsdamCity Palace, PotsdamPark BranitzSpreeweltenbad in LübbenauDiscover Brandenburg with Eurowings1. Explore royal residences in RheinsbergPrussian ruler Frederick II was so fond of the town of Rheinsberg, he lived there as crown prince. Now you can tour the royal residence and gardens on the water – heck, you can even jump in a horse drawn carriage if you’re feeling fancy.How to get to Rheinsberg from Berlin: 1 hour and 20 minutes by car Photo Credit: ©TMB-Fotoarchiv/Steffen Lehmann10. Find Russia in AlexandrowkaThese thirteen wooden Russian style houses bring a touch of rural Russia to north Potsdam. Alexandrowka was built around 1826, as the wish of former Prussian king, Friedrich Wilhelm III for 12 Russian singers of the soldier choir. These chocolate-box houses are now privately owned, but worth squeezing into a bike tour of Potsdam if you’re interested in this area’s diverse past. Photo Credit: ©TMB-Fotoarchiv/Ulf BöttcherCheck flights to Berlin3. Warm up in Tropical Islands ResortIt’s mid-November. It’s 25°C, you’re in a deckchair and you’re in the middle of Brandenburg, nursing a mojito. Unlikely as it is, Brandenburg has one of Europe’s biggest indoor beaches inside Tropical Islands Resort. This indoor, tropical beach park measures 360 metres long, 210 metres wide and an incredible 107 metres high (it’s also where you’ll find Germany’s biggest water slide). The rainforest covers 10,000² metres, and there are 50,000 species of plant here. How to get to Tropical Islands from Berlin: 1 hour on the train from Berlin Central Photo Credit: ©TMB-Fotoarchiv/Steffen LehmannDiscover Brandenburg with Eurowings9. Find the palaces and gardens of PotsdamPrussian monarchs left their mark on Potsdam, with 150 buildings constructed between 1730 and 1916. The Palaces line the River Havel and Lake Glienicke, making it a beautiful city to walk around. In fact, there’s so much history here that parts of Potsdam were listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1990, including Sanssouci Palace and Babelsberg Park. The Cecilienhof Palace which is in the “Neuer Garten” is a very popular attraction due to its place in history. The Russian colony of Alexandrovka, the Dutch quarter and its antique shops and the Bohemian weaver settlement of Nowawes are all part of Potsdam’s history which you can explore. How to get to Potsdam from Berlin: 30-40 minutes on the train from Berlin Central (The S-Bahn arrives every 10 minutes) Photo Credit: ©TMB-Fotoarchiv/Steffen Lehmann Discover the Diversity of Brandenburg5. Enjoy a punt ride through the Water MazeThe Spreewald Forest has an incredible network of streams and rivers. A quiet and peaceful water tour in the streams can be a romantic treat for your loved ones. As the punt floats in the streams, you can cosy up with plenty of blankets and enjoy a hot drink during the ride. The unique maze can be discovered from the water inside the Spreewald barge. Simply relax and enjoy the peace and quiet of your surroundings. How to get to Spreewald from Berlin: 1 hour and 10 minutes driving from Berlin Central 8. Explore Cottbus quaint Old TownCottbus in a city in the south of Brandenburg, and it’s the centre of the Lusatia region. The jewel of this small city is the pastel-hued Altmarkt, perfect for strolling round, drinking hot chocolates and photographing the pristine old town. Make a beeline for Spremberger Turm (the old clock tower), as you’ll get a great view from the top and a workout as you walk up. Branitz Park near Cottbus is internationally acclaimed for its landscape gardening. Created from what was once a flat garden, visitors are met with beautifully created surroundings with slopes and ponds portraying the art of landscaped gardens. How to get to Cottbus from Berlin: 1 hour and 20 minutes on the train from Berlin Central Photo Credit: ©TMB-Fotoarchiv/Rainer Weisflog6. Beelitz Heilstätten Tree Top WalkThe history of Beelitz Heilstätten dates back to the end of the 19th century when it was used as a sanitorium. Enjoy the mix of nature, history and architecture by walking on paths that run along the top of the forest. The impressive panoramic views on the path as well as at the high observation tower will give you a chance to see the vast surroundings of the largely abandoned site of the Beelitz Sanatorium. How to get to Beelitz Heilstätten from Berlin: 36 minutes on the train from Berlin Zoologischer Garten 4. The SpreewaldThe Spreewald has many locations and towns for you to explore on your visit. You can see old traditional Spreewald houses that stand on natural waterways are called “Fließe”, learn more about the culture and tradition. The incredible landscape and natural beauty of Spreewald Forest boasts of an exceptional natural habitat and intertwined network of water streams. The beauty of the meadows and fields combined with the unique habitat provides a home to a diverse flora. The best way to explore is to go on a hiking or cycle tour which also includes “a cucumber bike path” and refers to the most famous and widely popular product of the region. How to get to Spreewald Forest (Lübbenau) from Berlin: 1 hour s on the train from Berlin Ostbahnhoflast_img read more

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first_img by Jake Coyle, The Associated Press Posted Dec 22, 2017 11:54 am PDT Last Updated Dec 22, 2017 at 12:20 pm PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Anderson unravels love and work in ‘Phantom Thread’ NEW YORK, N.Y. – The day after last November’s presidential election, Paul Thomas Anderson boarded a plane to London to go make a movie about love.“Phantom Thread,” which began shooting days after the inauguration, is a hushed chamber drama made amid a time of wall-to-wall cacophony. For his second — and as it has turned out, likely final — collaboration with Daniel Day-Lewis, the protean 47-year-old Californian filmmaker endeavoured to make his British gothic romance — his “Rebecca.”“We have a really old-fashioned kind of film. It has nothing to do with the current state of the world. Maybe that’s good, in a way,” Anderson said in a recent interview in SoHo. “The more the world continues to turn upside down, the more appreciative we can be of all these small things every day that we have with each other.”It’s a nice sentiment that Anderson is immediately suspicious of.“It’s a good time for pitchforks, too,” he adds. “And I know just where to aim them.”But “Phantom Thread” needs nothing sharper than a seamstress’ needle to pierce and prod. The film is set in the meticulous world of a 1950s couturier. Reynolds Woodcock (Day-Lewis) is a women’s clothing designer of precise routine and enchanting craft. On a country trip from his London town house he meets a waitress at a seaside hotel, Alma (Vicky Krieps), who become his model and muse.Romance invades his rigidly guarded creative sphere and “Phantom Thread” becomes a spellbinding, and often funny, collision of art and love, stubborn isolation and won’t-take-no-for-an-answer intimacy. Alma, in the end, is a disruption just as eye-opening as the frogs that fell from the sky in Anderson’s “Magnolia.”“Are we disciplined enough to build in a proper pause to our life? Or are we so consumed with running around that it’s only acts of God or large outside forces that propel us to stop, take stock of how lucky we are?” says Anderson. “And without it, most of us will continue to be rushing around like lunatics, not looking at what’s right in front of us.”“Phantom Thread” at times takes on the ominous tone of a Hitchcock film, but it veers away from such suspenseful dramatics — “more told as — oh, I don’t know — as a peculiar romance movie,” says Anderson. “A kind of movie-movie way to look at what a relationship is really like.”“I wish there was a moment in ‘Rebecca’ about 45 minutes in where she was like, ‘Right. Enough of your s—. I’ve had it with your nastiness,’” he says, laughing.The movie, which Focus Features will release Monday, is yet another sharp swing in direction for Anderson, whose last three films (“There Will Be Blood,” ”The Master,” ”Inherent Vice”) were all period California dramas that dove headlong into America’s past: greed and fury in the turn-of-the-century oil boom; the existential drift of post-World War II America; the fading counterculture of Thomas Pynchon’s 1970s Los Angeles.While Day-Lewis’s Daniel Plainview of “There Will Be Blood” was a volcanic force of nature, his Reynolds Woodcock is a more refined figure of fervour. Perhaps not so dissimilar from Day-Lewis, he’s consumed by his much-celebrated work. But the demands of concentration required for his process are considerable. Some memorable scenes were partly improvised by the intensely Method-acting Day-Lewis, like one where Woodcock chastises Alma for bringing him tea at the wrong time. As she departs after a tongue-lashing, Woodcock fumes: “Yes, you can take the tea out but the interruption is staying right here with me.”“I thought, boy oh boy, is that a great one,” says Anderson, grinning “Only someone with access to that feeling could come up with that one.”Krieps, a 34-year-old newcomer from Luxembourg, didn’t meet Day-Lewis until the first day of shooting at a London church. She vividly remembers the echoing sound of his approaching steps.“Of course I was nervous,” says Krieps. “When I knew I was going to be his partner, I decided to forget whatever I knew. Not Google him, not watch his movies, not know anything about Method acting. I don’t know if it was right but it worked for not having a panic attack during the shooting. I tried to empty myself of all of expectations and hopes and fears. I tried to make Alma like a blank sheet.”Day-Lewis has said the film will be his last. The actor told W magazine of the decision: “Before making the film, I didn’t know I was going to stop acting. I do know that Paul and I laughed a lot before we made the movie. And then we stopped laughing because we were both overwhelmed by a sense of sadness.”Anderson says his only sadness was the usual one that accompanies a years-long project winding down. But there were notable interruptions to the film’s own single-minded bubble, and not only political distractions. On the final day of shooting, the filmmaker Jonathan Demme — a lifelong inspiration and friend to Anderson — died. “Phantom Thread” is dedicated to him.“It was a crazy combination of melancholy,” says Anderson of the final day. “His voice was rattling around in my head. ‘Buddy! You finished your film!’”The initial germ for “Phantom Thread” came when Anderson noticed the tender way his partner, the actress Maya Rudolph (they have four children together), looked at him while he was sick. Illness plays such a central role in the film that Rudolph first responded to the film by asking Anderson: “So you want me to poison you?”But Anderson, disarmingly genial for a genius filmmaker, shares little of Woodcock’s ways. While there’s seldom an imperfectly composed shot in his movies, Anderson’s way of filmmaking is exploratory and curious.“He gives you everything,” says Lesley Manville, who co-stars as Woodcock’s ever-present sister and partner. “You’ve got this amazing house to shoot in. You’ve got these extraordinary clothes. Great hairdresser, great makeup. Everything’s right. And then he lets you put your colour on this great canvas.”Among movie directors, Anderson estimates he’s “pretty low on the OCD scale.”“My obsessions are very different than (Woodcock’s),” says Anderson. “I’m not too strict with my rules. I’m moody as hell for sure. He thrives in silence. I thrive more with noise. I come from a very large family and I have a very large family. I kind of live much more in a pigpen than the world he creates.”“Phantom Thread” is, in a way, a mission statement for Anderson that suggests it’s possible — even necessary — to make art while not being a complete jerk. Now, he’s starting to, with eyes wide open, look for his next obsession.“The fun part of this job is finishing one and you feel open to limitless possibilities,” says Anderson. “Whatever your imagination can come up with.”___Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAPcenter_img In this image released by Focus Features, Daniel Day-Lewis, left, appears with director Paul Thomas Anderson on the set of “Phantom Thread.” In ‚ÄòPhantom Thread,’ Anderson stitches together a ‚Äòpeculiar’ love story for what Daniel Day-Lewis has said will be his final film. (Laurie Sparham/Focus Features via AP) last_img read more

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